Book Review: “How to Think Like an Anthropologist”

After each semester I evaluate what did and didn’t work in my classes. I didn’t teach Introduction to Anthropology for Fall 2018 so I had an extra semester to think about what I wanted to do with the course moving forward. I have decided to move on from using a textbook (despite the fact that…

Book Review: Not in Our Genes

I’ve been slacking on writing book reviews and so I need to get back to it so the next several posts will be just that (unless something happens in the news that warrants some interrogation). My next foray into reviews will be a book that I hold in very high regard. It’s a book I…

Film Review: Black Panther

Nearly three decades ago, my grandfather took me to the local pharmacy in Broadway, NC to get ice cream (it had an ice cream bar!). While there, I was perusing the shop and came across the comic book section; one in particular (see the feature image, I still have the comic). It wasn’t the incredibly…

Book Review: You Shall Know Them

You Shall Know Them (1953), or Les animaux dénaturés in the French, is a novel by Jean Marcel Bruller under the pseudonym Vercors. He is most famously known for The Silence of the Sea (1942), which explores the experience of a French family and a German occupying officer who attempts to convince the family of…

Book Review: Krippendorf’s Tribe

Krippendorf’s Tribe (1985), by Frank Parkin (1931-2011), explores the life of a British anthropologist and his experience with raising his family and a contrived research project. Parkin is a sociologist and has published nonfiction on Karl Marx (Middle Class Radicalism 1968, Class Inequality and Political Order 1971, Marxism and Class Theory 1979), Max Weber (Max…

Book Review: The Natural Superiority of Women

  The Natural Superiority of Women (5th Edition), by the biological and sociocultural anthropologist Ashley Montagu, serves as an important examination of the relationship between men and women in early feminist anthropology. The book covers various topics across its chapters, including the contribution of genes, biology, and culture to defending the author’s thesis: women are…

Book Review: Is Science Racist?

Is Science Racist: Debating Race, by Jonathan Marks- Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, was released in the midst of a societal reexamination of the pervasiveness of and value ascribed to race in America. As a new generation is being reacquainted with racial disparities that have existed in perpetuum in the…

Book Review- The Creative Spark

  The Creative Spark: How Imagination Made Humans Exceptional (2017), the latest book by Dr. Agustín Fuentes, explores the creative nature of humans through time. Fuentes, professor and chair of the anthropology department at the University of Notre Dame, is a pioneer in ethnoprimatology, the study of human-nonhuman primate interaction, and more recently has explored…